Arkansas jihadist says his murder of soldier was “for the sake of God, for the sake of Allah, the Lord of all the world”

Since the people in the Little Rock mosque are claiming not to know him, it is all the more unlikely that they will not take it upon themselves to explain, either to non-Muslims or to Muslims, exactly how he is getting Islam and jihad wrong.

Arkansas Jihad Update. “Suspect in soldier shooting says he was justified,” by Kelly P. Kissel for Associated Press, June 9 :

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – A Muslim convert charged with fatally shooting an American soldier at a military recruiting center said Tuesday that he doesn’t consider the killing a murder because U.S. military action in the Middle East made the killing justified.”I do feel I’m not guilty,” Abdulhakim Muhammad told The Associated Press in a collect call from the Pulaski County jail. “I don’t think it was murder, because murder is when a person kills another person without justified reason.”…

“Yes, I did tell the police upon my arrest that this was an act of retaliation, and not a reaction on the soldiers personally,” Muhammad said. He called it “a act, for the sake of God, for the sake of Allah, the Lord of all the world, and also a retaliation on U.S. military.”

In the interview, Muhammad also disputed his lawyer’s claim that he had been “radicalized” in a Yemeni prison and said fellow prisoners that some call terrorists were actually “very good Muslim brothers.”

He also said he didn’t specifically plan the shootings that morning.

“It’s been on my mind for awhile. It wasn’t nothing planned really. It was just the heat of the moment, you know,” said Muhammad, who was arrested on a highway shortly after the attack….

Muhammad, 23, said he wanted revenge for claims that American military personnel had desecrated copies of the Quran and killed or raped Muslims. “For this reason, no Muslim, male or female, sane or insane, little, big, small, old can accept or tolerate,” he said.

He said the U.S. military would never treat Christians and their Scriptures in the same manner.

 

No, they burn those.

“U.S. soldiers are killing innocent Muslim men and women. We believe that we have to strike back. We believe in eye for an eye. We don’t believe in turning the other cheek,” he said.Asked whether he considered the shootings at the recruiting center an act of war, Muhammad said “I didn’t know the soldiers personally, but yes, it was an attack of retaliation. And I feel that other attacks, not by me or people I know, but definitely Muslims in this country and others elsewhere, are going to attack for doing those things they did,” especially desecrating the Quran….

 

True to form in such cases, no Muslim in his area has ever heard of this guy:

Muhammad had moved to Arkansas in the spring to work at his father’s bus tour company and had never attended the Islamic Center of Little Rock, a mosque frequented by most of the area’s Muslims, said Iftikhar Pathan, the center’s president.Pathan said he spoke with most of the nearly 300 people who attend Friday prayers at the mosque and no one knew him. Those at the mosque also spoke with FBI agents in the days immediately after the shooting, he said.

“What he had in his mind, God knows,” Pathan said.

Last week, Hensley said his client, born Carlos Bledsoe, had been tortured and “radicalized” in a Yemeni prison after entering the country to teach English. He was held there for immigration violations, and Yemeni officials have denied mistreatment.

“Those claims … are all lies,” Muhammad said Tuesday. “That never happened in Yemen. The officials dealt with me in a gentle way.”

 

There’s a whole lotta lying going on, from the looks of this story.

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CAIR Works to Drive Wedge Between FBI and Muslim-Americans

Mohammad Qatanani’s mosque was full of FBI agents the night before he was to find out whether he would be deported.

But even though the federal government was trying to link Mr. Qatanani to foreign extremists, the agents weren’t there to keep an eye on him. They wanted to show their support for a Muslim leader they considered a valued ally for the relationships he helped forge between the FBI and Muslims in the wake of Sept. 11, 2001.

Across the nation, such grass-roots relationships between Muslims and the federal government are in jeopardy. A coalition of Muslim groups is calling for Muslims to stop cooperating with the FBI, not on national security or safety issues but on community outreach.

The coalition is upset over what it says is increasing government surveillance in mosques, new Justice Department guidelines that the groups say encourage profiling, and the FBI’s recent suspension of ties with the nation’s largest Muslim civil rights group, the Council on American-Islamic Relations.

A petition that opposes FBI tactics is circulating in Muslim communities and has been gaining support, said coalition Chairman Agha Saeed. The coalition, represented by the American Muslim Taskforce on Civil Rights and Elections, has requested a meeting with U.S. Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. to discuss what it sees as a deteriorating relationship between the FBI and Muslim communities.

“We have to decide what we’re doing as a country. If it’s not a war on Islam, then these practices must be stopped,” Mr. Saeed said. “We’re not asking for special treatment, just equal treatment.”

A number of Muslim groups, including some of the nation’s most prominent, have declined to sign the petition. Other organizations say they agree with parts of the petition but also support ongoing dialogue with law enforcement.

FBI spokesman John Miller said the agency values its relationships with Muslims and has worked hard on outreach efforts that range from town hall meetings to diversity training for FBI agents.

“I think a lot of these inaccurate statements and claims have the potential to do damage to those relationships,” Mr. Miller said. “What we’ve suggested to the major [Muslim] groups is that we try to separate the real issues from the sound bites, and if we can identify those real issues, tackle them together.”

Supporters of the petition cite recent cases in California and Michigan where the FBI has been accused of using informants and coercive tactics to spy on mosques.

A federal judge in California ordered a review last week of FBI inquiries into several Muslim groups and activists who claim they have been spied on and unfairly questioned. A Muslim organization in Detroit asked Mr. Holder in mid-April to investigate complaints that the FBI asked mosque attendees to spy on Islamic leaders and worshippers.

Mr. Miller said there is no factual basis for claims the FBI infiltrates mosques or conducts blanket surveillance of Muslim leaders. “Based on information of a threat of violence or a crime, we investigate individuals, and those investigations may take us to the places those individual go,” he said.

Mr. Miller questioned the timing of the petition, noting that it comes after the FBI suspended ties with CAIR, partly because it was named as an unindicted co-conspirator in the case against the Holy Land Foundation for Relief and Development, a group charged with bankrolling schools and social welfare programs the U.S. government says are controlled by Hamas.

Afsheen Shamsi, a spokeswoman for CAIR’s New Jersey chapter, dismissed the idea that the petition is retaliation. She said it reflects the concerns of Muslims who have grown tired of being stopped at airports, constant questioning and relentless scrutiny eight years after the attacks of Sept. 11.

“I believe the Muslim community is questioning whether the mosque visits and the handshakes are just a big show by the FBI, while behind the scenes, they continue to engage in questionable practices,” she said.

The petition is gaining little traction in New Jersey, home to one of the nation’s largest concentrations of Muslims, and a place where relationships between Muslims and law enforcement were heavily tested in the aftermath of 9/11.

New Jersey lost 744 residents in the attacks; many Muslims were among the victims. Several of the 9/11 hijackers had lived in Paterson for a time, and many Muslims detained after the attacks were held in New Jersey jails.

But Muslim leaders said the FBI distinguished itself by reaching out to Muslims, Arab Americans and groups like Sikhs in the wake of 9/11. Relationships forged between the FBI and Muslim leaders in New Jersey have endured.

At Mr. Qatanani’s mosque in Paterson after 9/11, the imam invited FBI agents to lecture congregants on how to recognize terrorists. Mr. Qatanani also helped train FBI agents on how to deal respectfully with Muslim detainees and community members.

When Mr. Qatanani became the subject of a high-profile deportation case last year, several high-ranking law enforcement officials took the stand on his behalf.

Aref Assaf, a mosque member and supporter of Mr. Qatanani who heads the Paterson-based American Arab Forum, said despite the imam’s immigration ordeal, he has urged his supporters not to sever ties with federal law enforcement. When the petition came up at a recent meeting of New Jersey Muslim leaders, Mr. Assaf said many declined to sign it.

“I’m a believer that law enforcement does not have a built-in anti-Muslim policy,” he said. “I know from dealing with FBI leaders they have been very forceful in their expressions of solidarity with our faith and culture. But there is a line, where we have to accept that as part of our dealings with them, they have a job to do, to make sure there are no terrorists in our midst or anywhere else.”

Mr. Saeed said relationships between the FBI and Muslims in other parts of the country have been more one-sided.

“There was a sense of mutuality at first. … These local connections people made, they wanted to see it as working with law enforcement and making the community better,” he said. “I am stupefied by the fact that [the FBI] are burning down the bridges that they need.”

BY Samantha Henry for ASSOCIATED PRESS

Pakistan-based Lashker-e-Taiba (LeT) could stage next attack on US: Report

Chicago: US security experts believe that the Pakistan-based Lashker-e-Taiba (LeT), with the help of a “global jihadist syndicate” of disaffected young Pakistanis, could well stage the next major attack on the American mainland.

“We are and should be concerned about the threat LeT poses, given its global network,” Juan Zarate, deputy national security adviser for counter-terrorism in the Bush administration, told the Chicago Tribune in an interview published Sunday.

According to Zarate, the FBI and other US intelligence agencies had been focussing on the LeT as the next big threat to US security even before the Nov 26-29, 2008, Mumbai terror attacks. The Tribune quoted US authorities as saying that the LeT was in many ways a bigger threat than the Al Qaeda, whose leadership was on the run from numerous Predator strikes in the Pakistan’s northwestern tribal areas.

Zarate’s remarks come amidst reports that the LeT had got a new set of commanders to replace Zakiur Rehman Lakhvi and Zarrar Shah who the Pakistani authorities detained after the Mumbai carnage that India has blamed on the terror group.

Pakistani investigators initially pointed to an LeT hand in last week’s attack on the Sri Lankan cricket team in Lahore but later ascribed it to the Al Qaeda.

“We are and should be concerned about the threat LeT poses, given its global network,” Zarate told the Tribune.

“It doesn’t just reside in South Asia. It is an organisation that has potential reach all over the world, including the US,” he added.

Bruce Riedel, chairman of the Obama administration’s Pakistan-Afghanistan strategy review team, said he believed such a “global jihadist syndicate” of disaffected young Pakistanis was the most likely mechanism for launching an attack on US soil.

The Mumbai attacks, according to Riedel, was only the latest of several such by such militants on soft targets frequented by Americans, including hotels in Kabul and Islamabad. The Mumbai mayhem had claimed the lives of over 170 people, including 26 foreigners – six of them American citizens. India had subsequently given the FBI access to Ajmal Amir Kasab, the sole terrorist captured alive during the carnage.

India says Kasab and nine other LeT operatives, all of whom were killed during the attacks that lasted for over 60 hours, had staged the assault.

India had also asked the FBI to examine evidence collected from five GPS phones used for coordinating the attack, requesting the FBI to analyse the data. The FBI established that the attack was mounted from the sea.

The Tribune said that Washington wanted Pakistan to not only dismantle LeT but also other similar groups founded during the Afghan war or later to participate in the insurgency in Jammu and Kashmir.

Quoting US and allied intelligence sources, the report claimed that potentially tens of thousands of Pakistanis had been trained in the LeT’s guerrilla camps in Pakistan, many of whom had gone on to fight for the Al Qaeda.

This includes a small number of US residents, some of who are believed to have returned home. Nearly a dozen Americans, including many members of the so-called Virginia Jihad Network, have been convicted in US courts of training at LeT camps and conspiring to provide material support to the group.

The US is also concerned about the thousands of disaffected Westerners and Pakistanis in Britain and other countries in Europe who travel frequently to Pakistan, the newspaper said.

Citizens of these countries do not need a visa for coming to the US. An unknown number of those have trained in LeT camps, and after getting “indoctrinated in its hatred of the West and returning home, they were free to travel to the United States with virtually no background check”, the Tribune said.

AAH Chairman Joe Kaufman to Speak Against CAIR-Florida Event

AAH CHAIRMAN TO SPEAK AGAINST TERROR-RELATED CAIR OUTSIDE THE GROUP’S ANNUAL FLORIDA FUNDRAISER
JOE KAUFMAN WILL HIGHLIGHT THE FBI’S RECENT BAN ON HOLDING JOINT MEETINGS WITH CAIR
(Fort Lauderdale, FL) Tomorrow, Saturday, March 7, 2009, Joe Kaufman, the Chairman of Americans Against Hate (AAH), an anti-bigotry and terrorism watchdog group, will be giving a speech outside a fundraising banquet being sponsored by the Florida chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR-Florida).

During Kaufman’s speech, he will discuss the FBI’s recent ban on all of its field offices from holding joint meetings with CAIR or any of CAIR’s local chapters. The ban occurred as a result of information linking CAIR to the Palestinian terrorist group Hamas.

Kaufman will also criticize Broward County for allowing CAIR the usage of its county convention center for the Hamas-affiliated group’s annual event.

Rally details:

When: Saturday, March 7, 2009, 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Where: Outside the Broward County Convention Center, at the corner of 17th St. and Eisenhower Blvd.
Directions: Take I-95 to 595; head east on 595 to US1 (Federal Hwy); head north on US1 about 3 lights to SE 17th St.; make a right and head east towards the beach; end at the corner of 17th St. and Eisenhower Blvd.

Joe Kaufman is available for interview. E-mail: info@americansagainsthate.org.
http://www.americansagainsthate.org/press_releases/PR-2009_CAIR-Florida_Banquet.php

Obama sent envelopes containing HIV-infected blood

hiv-p1220314Saad Hussein, a Muslim Ethiopian refugee from President Obama’s hometown of Chicago has been arrested for allegedly sending Obama and his staff envelopes containing HIV-infected blood, in the hopes of killing or harming them.

It’s only the second time ever that HIV-infected blood has been sent with malicious intent through the U.S. mail system, a spokesman for the U.S. Postal Inspection Service said.

 

In the weeks leading up to Obama’s inauguration, Saad Hussein, an Ethiopian refugee in his late 20s, sent an envelope addressed to “Barack Obama” to offices of the Illinois government in Springfield, Ill., according to court documents. 

The envelope contained a series of curious items, including a letter with reddish stains and an admission ticket for Obama’s election-night celebration in Chicago’s Grant Park. Court documents said Hussein, who takes drugs to treat a mental illness, later told FBI agents he is “very sick with HIV” and cut his fingers with a razor so he could bleed on the letter.

Hazmat teams were called in after the envelope was opened, and offices of the Illinois Department on Aging and the Department of Revenue were locked down for nearly two hours, locking 300 staffers in their offices, court documents said.

Hussein, with his brother acting as an interpreter, told FBI agents he was actually “an admirer” of Obama and was “seeking help from the government,” according to court documents. He also told them he was hoping to obtain tickets to the Inaugural ceremonies in Washington, the documents said.

Days after sending the letter to Obama, Hussein allegedly placed two more letters in the mail, one addressed to “Emanuel,” an apparent reference to Obama’s current Chief of Staff, Rahm Emanuel. The two letters contained what appeared to be dried blood, the court documents said.

Hussein, who has never held a job in the three years he’s been in the United States, was arrested last month. He was charged with “knowingly” mailing letters “containing HIV-infected blood, with the intent to kill or injure another,” in violation of federal law.

 

Mumbai-type terror attacks on US cities: FBI

Extremists “with large agendas and little money can use rudimentary weapons” to sow terror, raising the spectre that the Mumbai attacks could embolden terrorists seeking to attack US cities, warned the top US investigation agency FBI.

 

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is expanding its focus beyond al-Qaeda and into splinter groups, radicals who try to enter the country through the visa waiver programme and “home-grown terrorists,” FBI Director Robert S Mueller said at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington on Monday.

 

“The universe of crime and terrorism stretches out infinitely before us, and we too are working to find what we believe to be out there but cannot always see,” said the head of the agency charged with protecting the US against domestic and international terrorism.

 

“Our primary threat continues to come from Pakistan and Afghanistan,” Mueller added. “But we are seeing persistent activity elsewhere, from the Maghreb and the Sahel to Yemen.”

 

US, he said was increasingly concerned with pockets of people around the world that identify with al-Qaeda and its ideology. “Some may have little or no actual contact with al-Qaeda. Yet fringe organisations can quickly gain broader aspirations and appeal.”

 

Citing a planned attack against Fort Dix, he noted the men FBI convicted had engaged in target practice in the woods of Pennsylvania. They had watched al-Qaeda training videos. They had a map of the base and a plan to get in. And they had purchased semi-automatic weapons from an FBI sting operation.

 

“Like the Mumbai attackers, these men wanted to inflict as much damage as they could. And as the Mumbai attacks illustrate, the simplest of weapons can be quite deadly when combined with capability and intent,” Mueller said.

 

One particular concern, the FBI director said, springs from the country’s background as a “nation of immigrants”. Federal officials worry about pockets of possible Islamic radicals among melting-pot communities in the United States such as Seattle, San Diego, Miami or New York.

 

A Joint Terrorism Task Force led by the FBI, for instance, continues to investigate a group in Minneapolis after one young man last fall flew to Somalia and became what authorities believe to be the first US citizen to carry out a suicide bombing.

 

“The prospect of young men,  indoctrinated and radicalised in their own communities . . . is a perversion of the immigrant story,” Mueller added.

 

 

 

FBI Cuts Off CAIR Over Hamas Questions

FBI Cuts Off CAIR Over Hamas Questions

by Mary Jacoby
IPT News

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has cut off contacts with the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) amid mounting concern about the Muslim advocacy group’s roots in a Hamas-support network, the Investigative Project on Terrorism has learned. The decision to end contacts with CAIR was made quietly last summer as federal prosecutors prepared for a second trial of the Holy Land Foundation for Relief and Development (HLF), an Islamic charity accused of providing money and political support to the terrorist group Hamas, according to people with knowledge of the matter. CAIR and its chairman emeritus, Omar Ahmad, were named un-indicted co-conspirators in the HLF case. Both Ahmad and CAIR’s current national executive director, Nihad Awad, were revealed on government wiretaps as having been active participants in early Hamas-related organizational meetings in the United States. During testimony, FBI agent Lara Burns described CAIR as a front organization. Hamas is a US-designated foreign terrorist organization, and it’s been illegal since 1995 to provide support to it within the United States. The decision to end contacts with CAIR is a significant policy change for the FBI. For years, the FBI worked with the national organization and its state chapters to address Muslim community concerns about the potential for hate crimes and other civil liberty violations in the wake of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. But critics said the FBI improperly conferred legitimacy on CAIR by meeting with its officials, even as its own investigative files contained evidence of CAIR leaders’ ties to Hamas. Last autumn, FBI field offices began notifying state CAIR chapters that bureau officials could no longer meet with them until CAIR’s national leadership in Washington had addressed issues raised by the HLF trial, according to people with knowledge of the notifications. CAIR spokesman Ibrahim Hooper declined to comment Wednesday when the IPT called for comment. Before hanging up, Hooper said “We’re more than happy to cooperate with legitimate media. But we don’t cooperate with those who promote anti-Muslim bigotry.” In one letter obtained by IPT News, James E. Finch, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI’s Oklahoma City field office, canceled a meeting of the local Muslim Community Outreach Program, a state-federal program designed to enlist Muslims in terrorism prevention and investigate reports of civil liberties violations. “Regrettably, due to circumstances beyond my control, the meeting will be postponed until further notice as a result of the planned participation by the Oklahoma chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations,” Finch’s Oct. 8, 2008 letter to Muslim groups in the Oklahoma outreach program said. Finch made clear the Oklahoma office valued its relationship with local Muslims. He said the stumbling block to further outreach was CAIR’s national leadership. “[I]f CAIR wishes to pursue an outreach relationship with the FBI, certain issues must be addressed to the satisfaction of the FBI. Unfortunately, these issues cannot be addressed at the local level and must be addressed by the CAIR National Office in Washington, D.C.,” the letter said. A spokesman for the FBI’s Oklahoma City office referred questions about the letter to the FBI’s national press office. In Washington, FBI spokesman John Miller said, “We’ve certainly been in contact with CAIR chapters” about the un-indicted co-conspirator designation. “The letter speaks for itself.” Letters with similar wording were sent in other states, people with knowledge of the matter said. It is not known how many letters were issued, but the FBI has had strong working relationships with CAIR chapters in states including Ohio, Michigan, Arizona and Florida. Hamas was formed in 1987 as the Palestinian wing of the Muslim Brotherhood, the global Islamic political movement that aims to spread the rule of Shariah, or Islamic law, throughout the world. A North American branch of the Brotherhood supervised HLF, CAIR and other organizations to build political, financial and public relations support for Hamas, evidence at the HLF trial showed. The U.S.-based Brotherhood formed a Palestine Committee, headed by Hamas official Mousa Abu Marzook, in 1988 during the first intifada uprising in Palestinian territories against Israel. Hamas’s stated policy is for the destruction of Israel. CAIR co-founders Ahmad and Awad were early active members of the Palestine Committee, evidence showed. Wiretaps recorded the two CAIR leaders participating in strategy meetings of the committee in the 1990s, and both were also on a phone list of its members, the evidence showed. The first HLF trial in Texas ended in a mistrial in October 2007. In November 2008, the second trial resulted in convictions of five former HLF officials on all counts of providing material support to Hamas. It is unclear what changed between the first and second HLF trials to make the FBI rescind its policy of outreach to CAIR. The un-indicted co-conspirator designations were made on May 27, 2007 in connection with the first HLF trial. Moreover, much of the evidence linking the CAIR officials to Hamas was aired in an earlier public trial in 2006. CAIR, however, vigorously challenged the un-indicted co-conspirator designation as a violation of its First and Fifth Amendment rights, accusing the government of “demonization of all things Muslim” in a brief filed in the summer of 2007 with the US District Court for the Northern District of Texas. The co-conspirator designation is “particularly insidious and ironic as CAIR is an organization dedicated to fostering acceptance of Muslims in American society and protecting the civil liberties of all Muslim Americans,” CAIR’s brief read. The government filed a brief on Sept. 4, 2007 opposing CAIR’s filing, arguing the group lacked standing to challenge the co-conspirator designation and that the matter was moot, as the evidence was already entered into the public record. The judge never ruled on CAIR’s request. The HLF trial showed that CAIR was formed to covertly influence US opinions of the Palestinian conflict and Islam, but without revealing its connections to Hamas. For example, prosecutors introduced transcripts of wiretaps from a 1993 meeting in Philadelphia of the Palestine Committee, called to order by Ahmad (see page 10 of the hyperlink) and attended by Awad. In that meeting, Ahmad and others discussed the need to create a new political organization seemingly unconnected to Hamas or the Brotherhood. In one excerpt, (see page 4 of the link) an unidentified male said: “We must form a new organization for activism which will be neutral, because we are placed in a corner, we are place in a corner. It is known who we are, we are marked and I believe there should be a new neutral organization which works on both sides.” CAIR was founded a year later, in 1994, by Ahmad and Awad. In March 1994, Awad was taped at Miami’s Barry University publicly declaring his support for Hamas: “I am in support of the Hamas movement more than the PLO,” Awad said. A July 30, 1994 agenda for the Palestine Committee, seized by federal agents and introduced at trial, showed that “suggestions to develop the work” of HLF, CAIR and other organizations was on the agenda. Under the heading “The need for trained resources in the media and political fields,” the agenda said: “No doubt America is the ideal location to train the necessary resources to support the Movement worldwide.” By 1995, CAIR was conducting public relations work to counter the US detention of Mousa Abu Marzook, the Hamas official and Palestine Committee member who was also head of the Muslim Brotherhood in the US. A transcript of an August 1995 phone call intercepted by government investigators showed HLF officials Shukri Abu Baker and Ghassan Elashi talking about CAIR’s efforts (see page 12 of the link). Days before the 2001 terrorist attacks, the FBI raided the offices of Infocom, a Texas internet company connected to HLF. CAIR’s Nihad Awad appeared at a press conference outside Infocom headquarters to denounce what he called an “anti-Muslim witch hunt.” CAIR remained a vocal player in the public debate after 9/11. It developed relationships with members of Congress. FBI officials frequently attended CAIR fundraising banquets, and CAIR cited such contacts in its own literature and Web site as evidence of its good standing with the government.

Mary Jacoby is an award winning reporter who has worked for the Wall Street Journal, Salon.com, the St. Petersburg Times, Chicago Tribune and Roll Call. She may be reached at writetomaryjacoby@gmail.com