President Obama admits some Islamic terror suspects pose too great a threat to be released

President Barack Obama said one of the “biggest problems” in shutting down the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, may be how to deal with Islamic terror suspects who pose too great a threat to be released.

“It’s a messy situation. It’s not easy,” Obama told C- SPAN in an interview. “We’ve got a lot of people there who we should have tried early, but we didn’t. In some cases, evidence against them has been compromised. They may be dangerous, in which case we can’t release them, so finding how to deal with that I think is going to be one of our biggest problems.”

Obama, who called the Bush administration’s policy of indefinitely holding prisoners in Guantanamo a “mistake,” said he’s spoken to former President George W. Bush since taking office in January. He didn’t elaborate on the conversations, saying, “I think the general policy of keeping confidence with the predecessors is important.”

The Democratic president defended his decision to close the prison camp at Guantanamo Bay by early next year in a speech two days ago in Washington. He said some choices made by Bush and his advisers in pursuing the war on terrorism were “ad hoc” and “hasty” and left behind a “mess.” He repeated the criticism in the C-SPAN interview, which will air in full today at 10 a.m., Washington time.

Corners Cut

“There was a period of time after 9/11, understandably because people were fearful, where I think we cut too many corners and made some decisions that were contrary to who we are as a people,” Obama told the cable-television network.

Former Vice President Dick Cheney defended the Bush’s administration’s actions in a May 21 speech in Washington.

Cheney said the Bush administration employed tactics after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks that saved lives, including using harsh interrogation techniques. He said he would support those decisions again “without hesitation.”

Obama has banned the interrogation techniques in question, including simulated drowning, or water boarding. He contends the measures betray the country’s “ideals” and aren’t necessary to “wage an aggressive battle against organizations like al-Qaeda that want to do us harm.”

“I’m confident that we are stronger when we uphold our principles, that we are weaker when we start pushing them aside,” he told C-SPAN.

Class dismissed in Swat Valley

What Strict Islam or Sharia can do to the culture and education of a place is so evident from this video, very touching indeed. Class dismissed in Swat Valley Pakistan is a documentary profiling an 11-year-old Pakistani girl on the last day before the Taliban close down her school.  This is exactly what Hardcore Muslims with the support of Pakistani Army wanted to do in neighboring Kashmir valley, India. Indian Army has successfully been resisting this for the last 20 years. Europe and America should be aware of this; Sharia starts from small seemingly non harmful activity like a head scarf for girls and ladies to slowly transgress to extremes like this. Let us not take our democracies, which our fathers and forefathers gifted us, for granted and be complacent.

Muslim Burns a Young Copt Alive and Murders His Father Because of a Rumor!!!

A Muslim man set fire to a Coptic young man, murdered his father and wounded his younger brother, after it was rumored that the young Copt allegedly had a relationship with the Muslim man’s sister!!

islamic-burning-alive

The events took place in the small village of “Dmas” Meet-Ghamr, after a rumor spread around of a relationship between the 25-year-old Copt Shihata Sabri, and the sister of a Muslim man named Yasser Ahmed Qasim.
Yasser went to Coptic Shehata, holding a gasoline canister, poured it over him and set him on fire, as bystanders looked on in horror. The young Copt threw himself into the adjacent canal to try to put out the flames from his burning body. The fire left burns all over his body, leading to his death.

Following this incident, people in the village rallied and when the 60-years-old Sabri Shehata, father of the Coptic victim arrived, he was attacked by a group of Muslims stabbing him with knives and daggers; one stab penetrated his back to come out of his abdomen below the rib cage, resulting in his death, after being transferred to hospital.

A Coptic witness said that Yasser Ahmed, who is reputed to be a thug, and others have also beaten the Coptic victim’s younger brother, 22-year old Rami Sabri Shehata, causing a deep injury to his head.

The security forces moved into the village of Dmas, which has a population of 60,000 people, including over 1000 Copts, surrounded the victims’ house and deployed extra forces throughout the village.

The offenders were arrested together with the accused Yasser Ahmed Kassem and his friend, as well as the Copt Shehata Sabry who was held in custody in Dmas Hospital. The offenders were charged with deliberate homicide.

The body of Coptic victim Sabri Shehata was released for burial after prayers took place at the Church of Our Lady in the village of Dakados, which lies 20 kilometers from Dmas, amid a tight security siege.

A Muslim villager portrayed the incident as an honour killing stressing that it was because of Coptic Shehata Sabri teasing Yasser about a relationship he has with his sister, which prompted him and his friend to pour gasoline all over the Copt before setting him on fire. He denied that this incident will have an impact on the relations between the Muslims and Copts in the village.

The prosecution and the State Security Services are still investigating the incident amid media blackout.

Who are the Copts

 

 

In the time that Jesus was born, Egyptian as well as whole world (Jewish excluded) were pagan. The country was occupied by Romans. In year 60 AD, Apostil San Mark reaches Alexandria breeching the Holly Bible. In about 200 years, Egypt becomes a Christian country. The Church of Alexandria was one of the first five churches initiated by Apostils. So calling Egyptian Christians Arabs is wrong and unfair to them, its more appropriate recognize Copts with the Christians Egyptian native. Actually, Copts living in Egypt represents between 15-20% of the total living Population in Egypt.

Copts belongs to the Orthodox Church are more than 95% of the total Egyptian Copts. The remaining 5% are divided between the Coptic Catholic and the Coptic Protestant Churches. The Copts are by far the largest Christian community in Middle East.

The word “Coptic” is an English word and literally means Egyptian.

The Greek word “Egyptos” came from the ancient Egyptian words “Hikaptah” (Ha-Ka-Ptah). . The Arabs, after their conquest of Egypt in 641 AD called the population of Egypt “Gypt”, from the Greek word “Egyptos”

The known history of the Copts or Egypt starts with King Mina or Menas the first King, who united the northern and southern kingdoms of Egypt circa 3050 B.C. The ancient Egyptian civilization under the rule of the Pharaohs lasted for approximately 3000 years. Many Copts accepted the teachings of Christianity, possibly because the ancient Egyptian religions believed in life after death. This is evidenced by their elaborate efforts to preserve the bodies of the dead by embalming or mummification.

Like other early Christians throughout the Roman Empire, the Copts suffered from the persecution perpetrated against the new religion.

Many Copts shed their blood in testimony for Jesus Christ. Saint Mina or Menas is one of the major Coptic saints. He was martyred 309 A.D.

http://voiceofthecopts.org/en/

 

Pakistan: The greatest threat

The Islamic militants who attacked the Sri Lankan cricket team also have Britain and the US in their sights, write Omar Waraich and Raymond Whitaker.

 

Three separate bombings, including one in which a dead body was used to lure policemen to the scene, killed 15 people in Pakistan yesterday, underlining the helplessness of the authorities as they search in vain for the militants who attacked the Sri Lankan cricket team last week.

 

Six policemen were killed on Tuesday as a dozen gunmen ambushed the Sri Lankan team bus in broad daylight in the centre of Lahore, long regarded as Pakistan’s least-troubled city. The cricketers escaped with relatively minor wounds, but the sight of them having to be evacuated by helicopter from the pitch where they were due to play a Test match against Pakistan, coupled with widespread reporting of the reaction of English and Australian match officials, and coaches caught up in the attack, brought home to millions what the Foreign Secretary, David Miliband, described as the “mortal threat” that Pakistan faces from its “internal enemies”. It was the first direct terrorist attack on a sports team since the Munich Olympics in 1972.

Yesterday seven policemen and a bystander died in the worst bombing of the day, underlining the extent to which large areas of Pakistan have slipped out of government control. The incident occurred in the Badaber area of Peshawar, where the authorities believed they had achieved a rare success against the militants, who were recently driven back by local people working with law enforcement agencies. But the militants promised revenge, and lured the police to their deaths. An anonymous phone call said a body had been left in a car; when the police approached, a bomb in the car was detonated by remote control.

 

Hours earlier, an improvised explosive device damaged a military convoy as it passed through the notorious arms-manufacturing town of Darra Adam Khel, on the edge of the tribal areas. Three passers-by were killed and four troops injured, while a suicide bombing in a mosque in Khyber killed four and wounded five.

The attacks emphasise that the civilian government of President Asif Zardari is no more effective than the military rule of his predecessor, General Pervez Musharraf, at stemming the brutal advance of militancy across the country. Indeed, Mr Zardari and his Pakistan People’s Party seem more preoccupied with using the judiciary to exclude a former prime minister, Nawaz Sharif, and his brother, Shahbaz, from office than confronting the militant threat. Shahbaz was ousted as premier of Punjab province, whose capital is Lahore, just before the attack on the cricketers, bringing accusations that the political turmoil had hampered security arrangements.

Mr Miliband made his “mortal threat” comment during an appeal to Pakistan’s civilian politicians to cease their infighting and unite against adversaries who regard both sides as obstacles to their dream of turning Pakistan into a regime similar to Afghanistan under the Taliban. This year both American and British officials have become increasingly open about their fear that Pakistan – which has nuclear weapons under the control of a military at least to some extent open to extremist influence – is a greater danger than Afghanistan.

Security agencies have warned that two-thirds of the terror plots Britain faces originate in Pakistan, or are supported from there. But the inability or unwillingness of Pakistan to curb the flow of militants into Afghanistan also poses a direct threat to British and American troops there. The task of the Nato forces may be further complicated by political turmoil in Afghanistan – President Hamid Karzai, whose term expires next month, finally accepted yesterday that an election could not be held until August, when the “surge” of up to 30,000 extra US troops will have had time to stabilise the country. But he wants to stay in office until then, while his opponents insist that he step down in April.

Recently MPs were told in London that Pakistani generals still considered it in the country’s strategic interest to have the Taliban – which was created by Pakistan’s military intelligence service – in power in Kabul rather than President Karzai’s government, which is closer to India. Shaun Gregory, head of the Pakistan Security Research Unit at Bradford University, told the Foreign Affairs Committee that Pakistan’s role in the Afghan Taliban’s comeback “lies somewhere between passive tolerance … [and] open and active support”. Britain, the US and Nato found themselves “reliant on an ‘ally’ which does not share their interests and whom they cannot trust”.

Other experts told the committee that Pakistan showed little interest in tackling Islamic lmilitant commanders such as Jalaluddin Haqqani and Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, both old mujahedin leaders in Afghanistan who have thrown in their lot with al-Qa’ida and with the foreign Islamists who have made their base in Waziristan, the largest and most lawless of the tribal areas along the Pakistani border. Instead, the Pakistani military has been battling a new generation of younger militants who want to “Talibanise” Pakistan.

They include the leader of the Pakistan Taliban, Baitullah Mehsud, 34, who is accused of sending the suicide bombers who killed President Zardari’s wife, Benazir Bhutto, in December 2007, after which he inherited her political mantle. The Pakistani military formed an alliance with two of Mr Mehsud’s rivals, Maulvi Nazir and Hafiz Gul Bahadur, who concentrated on fighting in Afghanistan, and mounted a joint campaign against the Pakistani Taliban leader and his al-Qa’ida aligned Uzbek cohorts. But now, as Washington has stepped up its CIA-operated drone strikes in tribal areas, Mr Nazir and Mr Bahadur appear to have cut ties with the Pakistan army and joined Mr Mehsud to form “Shura Ittehad Mujahedin”, or Council of United Jihadists. The new Waziristan alliance has declared Afghanistan’s former leader, Mullah Omar, its spiritual guide, and Islamabad, Kabul and Washington its enemies.

Pakistan’s army sees the move as a setback to its efforts to divide and rule in the tribal areas, while the continuing spate of American missile attacks, including a report yesterday of a drone that crashed in the tribal areas, emphasises Washington’s lack of confidence in the Pakistan government’s ability to serve American interests.

The Obama administration has recently broadened its range of targets, striking for the first time last month training camps run by Hakimullah Mehsud, an associate of Baitullah Mehsud. Militants and suspected criminal elements working with Hakimullah were responsible for a flurry of attacks on Nato convoys destined for Afghanistan as they approached the Khyber Pass.

Islamabad is more concerned about militants such as Maulana Fazlullah of the Swat valley. The Taliban commander seized up to four-fifths of the valley in a brutal campaign, and, faced with losing the valley to the Taliban, the government sued for peace last month. It signed a deal with Mr Fazlullah’s estranged father-in-law, Sufi Mohammed, as the army ceased its military operation. The government bowed to Sufi Mohammed’s demands, imposing Islamic law in the area in return for a cessation of hostilities. Analysts worry the concession could create a sanctuary for Islamic militants, including al-Qa’ida, just a three-hour drive from Islamabad.

The spread of Islamic militancy across the Indus river to the more populous, settled areas of Pakistan is likely to widen the divergence of interests between Islamabad and the West still further. After six suicide attacks in 2006, suicide bombings in Pakistan have shot up to 10 times that number in each of the two following years. The commando-style attack in Lahore, echoing the assault on India’s richest city, Mumbai, last November, brings a new tactic to parts of Pakistan which have never had to think about the wars raging in the mountains and plains further west.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/pakistan-the-greatest-threat-1639779.html

AAH Chairman Joe Kaufman to Speak Against CAIR-Florida Event

AAH CHAIRMAN TO SPEAK AGAINST TERROR-RELATED CAIR OUTSIDE THE GROUP’S ANNUAL FLORIDA FUNDRAISER
JOE KAUFMAN WILL HIGHLIGHT THE FBI’S RECENT BAN ON HOLDING JOINT MEETINGS WITH CAIR
(Fort Lauderdale, FL) Tomorrow, Saturday, March 7, 2009, Joe Kaufman, the Chairman of Americans Against Hate (AAH), an anti-bigotry and terrorism watchdog group, will be giving a speech outside a fundraising banquet being sponsored by the Florida chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR-Florida).

During Kaufman’s speech, he will discuss the FBI’s recent ban on all of its field offices from holding joint meetings with CAIR or any of CAIR’s local chapters. The ban occurred as a result of information linking CAIR to the Palestinian terrorist group Hamas.

Kaufman will also criticize Broward County for allowing CAIR the usage of its county convention center for the Hamas-affiliated group’s annual event.

Rally details:

When: Saturday, March 7, 2009, 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Where: Outside the Broward County Convention Center, at the corner of 17th St. and Eisenhower Blvd.
Directions: Take I-95 to 595; head east on 595 to US1 (Federal Hwy); head north on US1 about 3 lights to SE 17th St.; make a right and head east towards the beach; end at the corner of 17th St. and Eisenhower Blvd.

Joe Kaufman is available for interview. E-mail: info@americansagainsthate.org.
http://www.americansagainsthate.org/press_releases/PR-2009_CAIR-Florida_Banquet.php

John Solecki: 3 days before he is beheaded in the terrorist republic of Pakistan

john-soleckiIslamic terrorists in Pakistan that are holding John Solecki, an American UN official in Pakistan have issued a letter and threatened to kill him if the government did not release more than 1,100 prisoners in four days. Solecki, who headed the UN refugee agency (UNHCR) in the southwestern province of Baluchistan, in the terrorist republic of Pakistan, was snatched at gunpoint on February 2 while traveling to work.

 

The kidnappers killed his driver. The threat to kill Solecki was declared in a letter sent by the Baluchistan Liberation United Front (BLUF) on Sunday to a local Pakistani news agency. “This is our final deadline,” the BLUF said in the letter. “We will kill Solecki after the expiry of the deadline and the government institutions will be held responsible,” it said. Irfan Saeed, the agency’s local bureau chief said they had received a telephone call on Sunday that a letter had been placed inside the wall of a government school in Quetta for release to the media.

 

04/06/2009

 

John Solecki released after demands met

 

 

 

John Solecki, the American United Nations worker who was abducted more than two months ago from Quetta, left Pakistan for the United States on Sunday. Solecki on Saturday turned up unharmed alongside a road in Mastung city of Balochistan, with his hands and feet bound and pleading “help me”. He was discovered around 30 miles south of Quetta after his Islamic captors, the Balochistan Liberation United Front (BLUF), called a local news agency to tell them where to look, officials said. Solecki, who headed the UNHCR’s operations in Quetta, made no public comment. The Islamic terror group of , BLUF, had threatened to behead him and issued a grainy video on February 13 of a blindfolded Solecki pleading for help and the final video released was on 4th of March saying he would be beheaded the same way as Piotr Stanczak( the innocent polish engineer who was brutally beheaded by the same group) . The abductors had demanded the release of hundreds of Islamic terrorists in alleged detention of security agencies and have gotten their way.

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